All Programs

  • ‘Podagogy’ in Advising and First Year Programs: Harnessing the Power of the Podcast

    Kayla Hogrefe

    ‘Podagogy’ in Advising and First Year Programs: Harnessing the Power of the Podcast

    Podcasting in the United States, along with the rest of the world, continues to grow as an important source of communication, entertainment, and education. Despite its rapid growth and widespread use, it is an untapped resource within higher education. This program will share the experience of two academic advisors who implemented a podcast for first year students that focused on topics of academic success. Participants will be empowered with the current research, knowledge, tools, and best practices to implement their own podcasts.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    9:10 am to 10:00 am

    Presented by

    Kayla Hogrefe, University of Connecticut School of Business

  • “New Phone. Who Dis?”: Using Text Messaging To Improve Student Persistence and Wellness

    Eric Wolford, Kristina Cammarano

    “New Phone. Who Dis?”: Using Text Messaging To Improve Student Persistence and Wellness

    Text messaging continues to be an effective and necessary avenue for colleges and universities to communicate with their students. The University of Nebraska at Omaha implemented a texting program in Fall 2018 to promote semester-to-semester persistence and help identify students in need of wellness interventions. The presenters will share their experience with starting and facilitating a texting program, how texting has improved student reenrollment outcomes, and what other institutions should consider when starting their own program.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    10:15 am to 11:05 am

    Presented by

    Eric Wolford, Director of Strategic Retention Programs, University of Nebraska at Omaha
    Kristina Cammarano, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Student Success, University of Nebraska at Omaha

  • #Fail: Providing Feedback when Employees Miss the Mark

    Jennifer Ludwig, Thomas Murray

    #Fail: Providing Feedback when Employees Miss the Mark

    Most student affairs professionals will find themselves supervising other staff, but often are uncomfortable with having to provide critical feedback. However, critical feedback is essential for both meeting organizational goals and encouraging individual professional development. The presenters will provide participants with a framework for providing feedback to supervisees that is honest, productive, and supportive of professional development.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    9:10 am to 10:00 am

    Presented by

    Jennifer Ludwig, Associate Director, University of Arizona
    Thomas Murray, Director, Professional Development & Collaborations for Student Success, University of Arizona

  • #WhileBlack: Cultivating Black Student Development Through Supervision, Advising, and Student Engagement

    Kevin Wright, Sarah Kutten

    #WhileBlack: Cultivating Black Student Development Through Supervision, Advising, and Student Engagement

    Many student affairs practices are intended to enhance student experiences; yet, race-neutral practices can create additional barriers for Black students. The presenters will identify harmful practices in the areas of supervision, advising, and student engagement. Using intersectional, asset-based, and race-oriented frameworks, presenters will help equip professionals reimagine their work toward the empowerment of Black students.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    11:20 am to 12:10 pm

    Presented by

    Kevin Wright, Black/African American Program Coordinator, University of Nevada-Las Vegas
    Sarah Kutten, Director of Student Services, University of Oregon

  • 1,998 Students Engaged, Empowered and Employed: Success in Leading Student Employment from Your Career Services Office

    J. Wyatt-Keyton

    1,998 Students Engaged, Empowered and Employed: Success in Leading Student Employment from Your Career Services Office

    The coordination and implementation of student employment within Career Services presents opportunities to increase engagement and provide intensive professional development to students across all majors and classifications. Presenters will provide a high-level and data-supported overview of the organizational structure, campus partnerships, and processes that shape a student employment unit within the Office of Career Services at a four-year, public institution. This program is suitable for professionals launching implementation of student employment within their office and practitioners charged with leading professional standards, career development, and/or professional education programs. 

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    4:00 pm to 4:45 pm

    Presented by

    J. Wyatt-Keyton, Director, Career Services, University of West Georgia

  • 25+ Years and Still Going Strong: Building a Sustainable Career in Student Affairs

    Jayne Brownell, Stephen Sutton

    25+ Years and Still Going Strong: Building a Sustainable Career in Student Affairs

    Student affairs has a retention problem. Too many people in our field do not persist long-term. We invest time, resources, and care in new professionals, and it's a loss to the profession when so many leave the field. In contrast, others have built long careers that are rewarding, positive, and fulfilling. In this session SSAOs who have been in the field for 25+ years will discuss the changes they've seen over time, reflect on how they have adapted to change, and offer advice on building a sustainable, enriching career in student affairs.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    4:00 pm to 4:50 pm

    Presented by

    Jayne Brownell, Vice President for Student Life, Miami University-Ohio
    Stephen Sutton, Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs, University of California-Berkeley

  • Advocacy and Activism on the Contested Campus: Professional Values, Social Justice, and Free Speech

    Frank Fernandez, Neal Hutchens, Brandi Hephner LaBanc, Kerry Melear

    Advocacy and Activism on the Contested Campus: Professional Values, Social Justice, and Free Speech

    In this session, the presenters will discuss key takeaways from their book that was recently published. The presenters will briefly address topics that may include: the legal landscape for free speech and expression, campus forums for speech for students and others, speech policies for student organizations, the intersection of free speech laws and institutional values, online speech and off-campus speech, and speech standards for employees or student affairs professionals.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    9:10 am to 10:00 am

    Presented by

    Frank Fernandez, Assistant Professor, University of Mississippi Main Campus
    Neal Hutchens, Chair and Professor of Higher Education, University of Mississippi Main Campus
    Brandi Hephner LaBanc, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, University of Mississippi Main Campus
    Kerry Melear, Professor of Higher Education, University of Mississippi Main Campus

  • Assessing Social Media Threats for Conduct and BITs

    Brian Van Brunt, Amy Murphy

    Assessing Social Media Threats for Conduct and BITs

    The presenters will address the challenge of assessing concerning online communication, written narratives, and artistic works. The program is divided into three sections: 1) a discussion of the growing use of social media and a review of foundational elements of threat assessment; 2) a review of the assessment and intervention processes when a concern is identified; and 3) a discussion of contagion effect and postvention. Several case examples will be used to help the group identify and practice.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    9:10 am to 10:00 am

    Presented by

    Brian Van Brunt, Senior Vice President for Professional Program Development, The NCHERM Group LLC
    Amy Murphy, Assistant Professor, Angelo State University

  • Being a Christian in Higher Education

    Christy Moran Craft

    Being a Christian in Higher Education

    As a primary goal of this discussion-oriented session, the presenter will provide an overview of the existing literature about Christian students, faculty, and staff in higher education. The presenter will also devote special attention to understanding the unique challenges and opportunities of Christians working in public colleges and universities. Throughout the session, participants will have the opportunity to share their own and others' experiences with the goal of developing a new network of colleagues.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    8:10 am to 10:00 am

    Presented by

    Christy Moran Craft, Professor, Kansas State University

  • Being Intentional In Your Student Affairs Professional Development: Creating a Competency Roadmap

    Allie Goldstein, Dustin Grabsch, Robert Just

    Being Intentional In Your Student Affairs Professional Development: Creating a Competency Roadmap

    We often spend time being intentional in our guidance of students: through what classes to take, what opportunities will help them make the most of their college experience, and more. But how often do we pause and reflect on our own development? Using the NASPA/ACPA Professional Competencies as a guide, this session will encourage the creation of a professional competency roadmap to guide attendees' continued development as student affairs practitioners.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    2:45 pm to 3:35 pm

    Presented by

    Allie Goldstein, Assistant Professor, Pennsylvania State University-University Park
    Dustin Grabsch, Director of Academic Initiatives, Southern Methodist University
    Robert Just, Assistant Director for Leadership Programs, University of San Francisco

  • Beyond Green: Addressing Challenges in Student Affairs through a Sustainability Lens

    Grace Kazmierski

    Beyond Green: Addressing Challenges in Student Affairs through a Sustainability Lens

    Sustainability is more than just living "green." As professionals, how can we face challenges and make decisions considering the social, economic, and environmental principles of sustainability? Using the triple bottom line as a framework, the presenter will share how we as student affairs professionals can use a sustainability lens to better address the changing political and social environments in which we work.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    4:00 pm to 4:50 pm

    Presented by

    Grace Kazmierski, University of South Carolina

  • Beyond Racial Fractions: Empowering Multiracial Students on Campus

    Alicia Stites

    Beyond Racial Fractions: Empowering Multiracial Students on Campus

    As multiracial student populations grow on college campuses, professionals must be more intentional about the support they provide these students. A healthy multiracial identity allows for greater social awareness and sense of self. Presenters will share findings of a qualitative study examining multiracial identity development and implications for practice. Presenters will engage participants in critically evaluating their current models of support for multiracial students.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    2:45 pm to 3:35 pm

    Presented by

    Alicia Stites, Texas State University

  • Beyond Surveys: Practical Assessment Strategies for Multiple Contexts and Roles

    Ashley Jones, Marianne Magjuka, Rita Miller

    Beyond Surveys: Practical Assessment Strategies for Multiple Contexts and Roles

    Many institutions are focused on the importance of making data-driven decisions, but many of us find ourselves operating in data silos. Although some administrators have assessment in their title or as a core function of the job duties, more often assessment falls under "other duties as assigned" job functions. The presenters will bring to light the role of assessment at different institutions and provide strategies to overcome obstacles at varying levels of leadership. 

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    8:00 am to 8:50 am

    Presented by

    Ashley Jones, Assistant Director of Student Emergency Services, The University of Texas at Austin
    Marianne Magjuka, Assistant Dean of Students and Executive Director of the Office of Civic & Community Engagement, Wake Forest University
    Rita Miller, Director of Assessment in the Office of Vice President of Student Affairs, The University of Texas at Austin

  • Bridging the Silos: A United Approach Among Academic and Student Affairs to Substance Misuse Prevention and Student Well-being

    Kate Lower, Susan Hochman, Lori Holleran-Steiker

    Bridging the Silos: A United Approach Among Academic and Student Affairs to Substance Misuse Prevention and Student Well-being

    A team of academic and student affairs professionals launched an initiative called SHIFT which aims to "shift" the campus culture around substance use. This endeavor leverages existing programs while further cultivating innovative ideas among the campus community. Presenters in this session will share the process of uniting forces among student affairs professionals and leading faculty with the common goal of enhancing well-being to directly contribute to the prevention of substance misuse. Present and future strategies will be shared as the initiative continues.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    10:15 am to 11:05 am

    Presented by

    Kate Lower, SHIFT Director, The University of Texas at Austin
    Susan Hochman, Assistant Director, The University of Texas at Austin
    Lori Holleran-Steiker, Associate Dean and Director of Instruction, Engagement and Wellness, School of Undergraduate Studies; Distinguished Professor and Steve Hicks Professor of Addictions and Substance Abuse Services, The University of Texas at Austin

  • Building Evidence-Informed Programs: A Practical Guide to Applying Theory and Research to Practice

    Andrea Pope, Sara Finney

    Building Evidence-Informed Programs: A Practical Guide to Applying Theory and Research to Practice

    Given the critical role student affairs educators play in facilitating student development, our professional standards note we have a responsibility to build intentional programs informed by theory and research. In this session, the presenters will guide participants through the steps of developing evidence-informed programs. The presenters will also share databases that synthesize research to simplify building evidence-informed programs. Participants will leave inspired and equipped to develop their own evidence-informed programs.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    9:10 am to 10:00 am

    Presented by

    Andrea Pope, Graduate Assessment Consultant, James Madison University
    Sara Finney, James Madison University

  • Building Gatekeeper Skills Among Latinx and Hispanic Students Through a Virtual Role-Play Simulation

    Glenn Albright

    Building Gatekeeper Skills Among Latinx and Hispanic Students Through a Virtual Role-Play Simulation

    Hispanic and Latinx students have higher levels of anxiety and depression and are less willing to seek help compared to African American and Caucasians students. This presentation reviews the impact of an online virtual human role-play gatekeeper simulation on a national sample of 6239 Hispanic and Latinx students from 37 colleges.  Participants reported significant increases in preparedness, likelihood and self-efficacy to identify, talk to, and refer fellow students in psychological distress and increases in the number of students approached and referred to support services.  Best practices for implementing the simulation will be discussed.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    10:15 am to 11:05 am

    Presented by

    Glenn Albright, CUNY Baruch College

  • Busting up the Box: Entrepreneurial Approaches to Academic and Student Affairs Partnerships

    Eric Norman, Lori Allen, Amanda Walker

    Busting up the Box: Entrepreneurial Approaches to Academic and Student Affairs Partnerships

    Institutions of higher education are faced with increased pressure to attract, retain, and graduate students. While student affairs and academic affairs employ different operational, financial, and philosophical models, there is an increasing need for collaborations across the institution to create an integrated student experience. Presenters will go beyond historical higher education models and traditional collaborations, and share three entrepreneurial approaches that enhance the student experience. 

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    11:20 am to 12:10 pm

    Presented by

    Eric Norman, Vice President of Student Affairs, Austin Peay State University
    Lori Allen, Assistant Professor, College of Education, Austin Peay State University
    Amanda Walker, Director, Career Services, Austin Peay State University

  • Collaborating to Investigate Hazing Allegations Across Campus

    Maureen Grewe, Tad Derrick

    Collaborating to Investigate Hazing Allegations Across Campus

    Hazing concerns continue to be major liability and headache for universities. It cannot be just conduct and Greek life offices that are responsible for managing these concerns. The presenters will showcase best practices and participants will walk away with tangible materials to collaborate with campus partners to address hazing on their campuses.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    4:00 pm to 4:50 pm

    Presented by

    Maureen Grewe, Director for Student Conduct, University of South Carolina
    Tad Derrick, Assistant Director of Harm Reduction and Compliance, University of South Carolina

  • Collaborations to Foster Student Success - Findings & Recommendations of University of Pittsburgh’s Task Force on Opioid Use Disorder

    Brian Hamluk

    Collaborations to Foster Student Success - Findings & Recommendations of University of Pittsburgh’s Task Force on Opioid Use Disorder

    The use and misuse of opioids by college students has risen significantly over the past two decades. College students with depressive symptoms or suicidal thoughts are at increased risk for misusing opioids, including use to self-medicate for depression or anxiety. This program highlights the campus and community efforts of the University of Pittsburgh's Task Force on Opioid Use, and educates participants in identifying a path forward to address the issue on their campus.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    9:10 am to 10:00 am

    Presented by

    Brian Hamluk, Director of Administration, University of Pittsburgh-Pittsburgh Campus

  • Collaborative Efforts To Redefine the Scholar-Athlete

    Leah Turner, Joe Cross

    Collaborative Efforts To Redefine the Scholar-Athlete

    The diversity and outreach unit of the Jackson School of Geosciences at the University of Texas at Austin is teaming up with the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign to build STEM academic programming for youth summer sport camps in effort to develop the "scholar" identity of a student-athlete. The presenters will outline these collaborative efforts and how student affairs professionals can develop buy-in and support through external and internal partnerships.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    9:10 am to 10:00 am

    Presented by

    Leah Turner, Director of GeoSTEM, The University of Texas at Austin
    Joe Cross, Research Associate/Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  • College Student Activism, Race Relations and Media Cultures

    Cerri Banks, Byron McCrae, Alejandro Vasquez, Paul Buckley, Rolanda Burney

    College Student Activism, Race Relations and Media Cultures

    Based on the forthcoming text, No Justice! No Peace! College Student Activism, Race Relations and Media Cultures, editors Banks and Vasquez and contributors will engage participants in conversation about student activism, race, and media using campus scenarios. Rather than branding student activists as an adversarial problem, colleges and universities should acknowledge and embrace the ways students make their voices heard. Their energy, commitment, and approaches can inspire institutional change.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    4:00 pm to 4:50 pm

    Presented by

    Cerri Banks, Dean of Students & Vice President for Student Affairs, Skidmore College
    Byron McCrae, Vice President for Student Life and Dean of Students, Davidson College
    Alejandro Vasquez, Vice President, Keeling & Associates, LLC
    Paul Buckley, Assistant Vice President, Colorado College
    Rolanda Burney, Interim Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and Campus Life, University of Massachusetts Amherst

  • Connecting the Dots: Promising Practices in Higher Education Threat Assessment Case Management, Communication, and Collaboration

    Laurie Casteen, Alexandra Hall, Edward Markowski

    Connecting the Dots: Promising Practices in Higher Education Threat Assessment Case Management, Communication, and Collaboration

    A robust threat assessment program requires collaborative, interdisciplinary efforts across campus, as well as campus-wide engagement of students, faculty, and staff in promoting the safety both of individuals and the broader institutional community. In this session, appropriate for all administrators, presenters will focus on how to develop a high-functioning threat assessment team and equip it with the tools to be effective. Presenters also will address team development and training; communication and documentation best practices; and effective case management strategies that can be tailored to any institution regardless of size or available resources.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    8:00 am to 8:50 am

    Presented by

    Laurie Casteen, Associate Dean of Students, University of Virginia-Main Campus
    Alexandra Hall, Assistant Dean of Students, University of Virginia-Main Campus
    Edward Markowski, Director of Threat Assessment, University of Virginia

  • Converging Goals: Engaging Faculty in Student Success

    Cristina Lawson, Allison Cruz

    Converging Goals: Engaging Faculty in Student Success

    Faculty are paramount in the transition, retention, and success of our students. As student affairs professionals, it is our responsibility to build collegiality with faculty in order to successfully champion quality programming that connects students with supportive faculty mentors. In this session, presenters will discuss the importance of this work, outline the professoriate and their competing priorities, and detail methods for faculty recruitment and training. Presenters will conclude by sharing tangible ideas for programming that participants can apply to their own institutions.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    4:00 pm to 4:50 pm

    Presented by

    Cristina Lawson, Tulane University of Louisiana
    Allison Cruz, Director, Tulane University of Louisiana

  • Creating a Best Practice Graduate Student Affairs Model

    Thomas Rock

    Creating a Best Practice Graduate Student Affairs Model

    While the undergraduate student affairs model is widely published and supported, there is not a model for graduate student affairs (GSA). With support from leadership at Teachers College, a team of staff members examined the student experience at their institution, which is the largest and most comprehensive graduate school of education in the world. The team reviewed organizational structures, staffing, and strategies over a six-month period and launched the Graduate Student Pathway Model, which aims to facilitate and enhance the student experience at Teachers College so that each student has the opportunity to flourish and achieve success.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    10:15 am to 11:05 am

    Presented by

    Thomas Rock, Vice Provost for Student Affairs, Teachers College at Columbia University

  • Creating the Prison-to-School Pipeline: Student Affairs & Justice-Impacted Students

    Michael Brick

    Creating the Prison-to-School Pipeline: Student Affairs & Justice-Impacted Students

    The presenter will inform student affairs professionals about justice-impacted students and the role that student affairs can play in creating an equitable landscape for those who are or have been incarcerated. Best practices will be shared about how to work with these students and how to create policies that remove barriers for their success.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    4:00 pm to 4:50 pm

    Presented by

    Michael Brick, Senior Research Analyst, Institute for Higher Education Policy

  • Culture Change: Championing Free Speech, Not Just Managing It

    Erik Kneubuehl

    Culture Change: Championing Free Speech, Not Just Managing It

    Free speech movements across higher education are expected to increase with the upcoming presidential elections in 2020. The Association of American Colleges and Universities "Call to Action" stressed higher education's responsibility to start civil discourse conversations, impacting free speech. East Carolina University made a significant change in 2016 that focused on turning free speech from conflict into conversation. That investment has led the university to redevelop policies, practices, and culture that now champions rather than manages free speech.   

    When

    Monday, March 30
    9:10 am to 10:00 am

    Presented by

    Erik Kneubuehl, Associate Vice Chancellor, East Carolina University

  • Decolonizing the Job Interview Process: Creating More Inclusive, Informative Campus Interviews

    Jane Pizzolato, Kenneth Importante, Denée Jackson, Julian Juan, Rachelle Simpson, Denise Morales, Teresa Graham Brett

    Decolonizing the Job Interview Process: Creating More Inclusive, Informative Campus Interviews

    The presenters brings together interviewers and successful interviewees from three searches for entry-level positions. These searches used a decolonized interviewing model to shift from canned presentations and questions asking for demonstrations of knowledge, to how candidates engage in shared decision-making, value diversity in practice, and demonstrate fit between their values and practices, and those of the department. This session will focus on describing the model and how to apply this model to other institutions.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    11:20 am to 12:10 pm

    Presented by

    Jane Pizzolato, University of Arizona
    Kenneth Importante, Director, Asian Pacific American Student Affairs, University of Arizona
    Denée Jackson, Masculinities in the Mix Coordinator, University of Arizona
    Julian Juan, Masculinities in the Mix Coordinator, University of Arizona
    Rachelle Simpson, Director, Native American Student Affairs, University of Arizona
    Denise Morales, Coordinator, Native American Student Affairs, University of Arizona
    Teresa Graham Brett, Assistant Vice Provost, Inclusion & Multicultural Affairs, University of Arizona

  • Disrupting Masculinity and Patriarchy: Stories of Men Transforming

    James Lorello

    Disrupting Masculinity and Patriarchy: Stories of Men Transforming

    The presenter will share the results, construction, and implications of a recent critical qualitative doctoral study of eight participants engaged in a critical, pro-feminist college men's group. The study explored participants' experiences of masculine and patriarchal norms; what happened socially, interpersonally, and emotionally when these norms were disrupted; and the meaning and transformation that came out of their involvement in a group dedicated to disrupting masculinity and patriarchy. 

    When

    Monday, March 30
    4:00 pm to 4:50 pm

    Presented by

    James Lorello, Associate Dean of Students and Director of Student Conduct, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

  • Dreams Continued: Supporting Undocumented Graduate Students on Campuses

    Ronnie Rios, Feldblum Miriam, Valeria Garcia, Ireri Rivas

    Dreams Continued: Supporting Undocumented Graduate Students on Campuses

    The presenters will provide participants with information and resources they need to effectively recruit, admit, and support undocumented graduate students. This includes an overview of current trends, issues, and opportunities, as well as examples of effective practices, sample tools and policies, and useful tips. Attendees will hear from scholar-practitioners and policy advocates about promising practices, campus challenges, and will work through different scenarios.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    4:00 pm to 4:50 pm

    Presented by

    Ronnie Rios, Assitant Dean of Students/Deputy Director, Identity and inclusion, University of Michigan
    Feldblum Miriam, Executive Director, Presidents' Alliance on Higher Education & Immigration
    Valeria Garcia, Program Director, University of California-Los Angeles
    Ireri Rivas, Director, Student Support Services, University of Chicago

  • Engaging and Supporting Parenting Students: A Journey to Creating a Collaborative Five-Year Strategic Plan

    Joshua Rider

    Engaging and Supporting Parenting Students: A Journey to Creating a Collaborative Five-Year Strategic Plan

    Parenting student services have become increasingly necessary as their numbers increase on our campuses. The presenter will share the experience of creating a collaborative five year parenting student strategic plan at Kent State University, a primarily traditional large state institution. The presenter will share how the Family Friendly Campus Toolkit, a free resource developed by the Program Evaluation and Research Group at Endicott College, has been and can be used to guide and tailor the work to institution and student specific needs.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    10:15 am to 11:05 am

    Presented by

    Joshua Rider, Assistant Dean of Students and Director, Center for Adult and Veteran Services, Kent State University

  • Engaging Community College Students through Purposeful Space and Operational Redesign

    Scott Markland, Matthew Moore

    Engaging Community College Students through Purposeful Space and Operational Redesign

    The presenters will share a first-hand view of a five-year process of collaboration and redesign at a large, urban community college. The goal of this work is to align operations and space as a part of a $16 million renovation project influenced by key student success initiatives, specifically Guided Pathways and Integrated Entry Systems. Join us for a candid discussion on lessons learned from integrating student services and creating a built and virtual environment to facilitate improved student entry and completion outcomes.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    10:15 am to 11:05 am

    Presented by

    Scott Markland, Senior Vice President, Sinclair Community College
    Matthew Moore, Assistant Vice President, Enrollment Operations and Student Services, Sinclair Community College

  • Entering White Spaces: The Experiences Of Latinas At Predominantly White Institutions

    Jennifer Valdez, Jessica Rivera, Victoria Olivo

    Entering White Spaces: The Experiences Of Latinas At Predominantly White Institutions

    The Latinx population in the United States is rapidly growing, shifting the demographics at historically white institutions. Latinx issues are often discussed as a collective, ignoring intersecting identities. As Latinas who are currently enrolled at a primarily white institution (PWI), the presenters will highlight the unique challenges they encounter as a result of their ethnic/racialized and gendered experience. Through research and testimonials, the presenters will provide information on how to best support Latina students.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    8:00 am to 8:50 am

    Presented by

    Jennifer Valdez, The University of Texas at Austin
    Jessica Rivera, Graduate Student, The Ohio State University
    Victoria Olivo, Graduate Student, The Ohio State University

  • Faith and Chai: How Desi College Students Explore Belonging and Intersections of Cultural and Spiritual Identities

    Justin Samuel

    Faith and Chai: How Desi College Students Explore Belonging and Intersections of Cultural and Spiritual Identities

    Despite the expeditious growth of South Asian Americans (SAAs), not much is known about them in the collegiate setting. SAAs are diverse people who may geographically trace their lineage to one part of the world, but speak many languages and identify with a multitude of spiritual traditions. In thiss session, the presenter reflects on being an SAA Christian. In doing so, the presenter will articulate how stereotypes and monolithic ideas of Asian Americans can be problematic.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    10:15 am to 11:05 am

    Presented by

    Justin Samuel, Assistant Director for Residence Life, The University of Texas at Austin

  • Freedom of Expression and Inclusion: Setting the Stage for First-Year Students and Strategies for Campus Communities

    Sarah Steinkamp, Lori White

    Freedom of Expression and Inclusion: Setting the Stage for First-Year Students and Strategies for Campus Communities

    The presenters will discuss Washington University in St. Louis' Freedom of Expression and Inclusion (FOE&I) initiatives that, through connected programing, engaged the campus on FOE&I. WashU has connected a workshop, film, unity event, and reading program book selection to encourage students to address difference meaningfully in a discursive environment and build a community that fosters productive exchange. Learn firsthand from the WashU practitioners about these initiatives and how campuses might apply similar strategies.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    2:45 pm to 3:35 pm

    Presented by

    Sarah Steinkamp, Washington University in St Louis
    Lori White, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, Washington University in St Louis

  • From BAND-AIDS to an Action Plan: Organizing Across Campus and the Community to End Campus Hunger

    Nathan Alleman, Cara Cliburn Allen, Craig Nash

    From BAND-AIDS to an Action Plan: Organizing Across Campus and the Community to End Campus Hunger

    With thousands of campus food pantries operating at all types of institutions, the emerging challenge for administrators has shifted from founding new resources to improving coordination between them. Presenters will provide a constituent coordinating strategy called Hunger-Free Communities (HFC) Coalitions. HFC was first effective in local settings and now has been applied to a university context. Participants will be introduced to the HFC model, walked through implementation, and map out how it might be utilized on their own campus.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    4:00 pm to 4:50 pm

    Presented by

    Nathan Alleman, Associate Professor, Baylor University
    Cara Cliburn Allen, Doctoral Candidate and Graduate Research Fellow, Texas Hunger Initiative, Baylor University
    Craig Nash, Regional Manager for Child Hunger Outreach, Texas Hunger Initiative; Coordinator, Hunger Free Community Coalition, Baylor University

  • From Community College to Career: Assessing a NACE Career Readiness Competency Targeted Training Curriculum for Student Employees

    Carrie Rose, Sara Sanders, Erika Gupta

    From Community College to Career: Assessing a NACE Career Readiness Competency Targeted Training Curriculum for Student Employees

    Student Life at Austin Community College developed and piloted a training curriculum in Fall 2019 for Federal Work-Study student employees focused on the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) competencies for career readiness. This training curriculum includes workshops, individualized success planning meetings, and a student self-assessment tool to promote student academic and professional success. The presenters will discuss the development and assessment of the curriculum for application at other institutions.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    8:00 am to 8:50 am

    Presented by

    Carrie Rose, Coordinator Student Life, Austin Community College District
    Sara Sanders, Student Life Coordinator, Austin Community College District
    Erika Gupta, Student Life Specialist , Austin Community College District

  • From Face Time to FaceTime: How to Support Online Student Engagement

    Sophie Braga de Barros, Jenna Levine

    From Face Time to FaceTime: How to Support Online Student Engagement

    This session will focus on how to adapt traditional campus engagement services to address the needs of a growing online student body. The presenters will share results of pilot initiatives from the Center for Student Engagement at Florida International University and facilitate discussion about strategies and techniques to support online student success.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    8:00 am to 8:50 am

    Presented by

    Sophie Braga de Barros, Program Coordinator for Student Engagement, Florida International University
    Jenna Levine, Peer Mentor Program Manager , Florida International University

  • Higher Education Policy Update: Federal and State Priorities for Student Affairs Professionals

    Teri Hinds, Diana Ali

    Higher Education Policy Update: Federal and State Priorities for Student Affairs Professionals

    Many of the issues occupying the minds of public policymakers around the country are directly related to the day to day work of student affairs professionals. The presenters will provide a broad overview of the federal and state policy landscape with a special focus on issues that align to the NASPA Strategic Plan and Public Policy Agenda. It is expected that presenters will cover financial aid, costs, and student debt; sexual assault prevention and response; equity and inclusion for trans students, immigrants, and veterans; guns on campus; and campus free speech.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    4:00 pm to 4:50 pm

    Presented by

    Teri Hinds, Director of Policy Research & Advocacy, NASPA
    Diana Ali, Assistant Director of Policy Research & Advocacy, NASPA

  • Holding Down the Fort: Lessons in Providing Interim Leadership in Student Affairs Through Major Institutional Changes

    Nicole Phillips, Eddie Howard , Peggy Crowe, Helen-Grace Ryan

    Holding Down the Fort: Lessons in Providing Interim Leadership in Student Affairs Through Major Institutional Changes

    Interim appointments are delicate yet rewarding leadership opportunities. Professionals occupying interim positions have the opportunity to lead in directions that redefine and realign positions in their divisions. Presenters will hold space for participants to consider opportunities and complexities of assuming an interim appointment during major institutional change. Practical strategies will be provided to empower student affairs professionals to confidently serve in interim leadership positions through extreme institutional shifts.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    10:15 am to 11:05 am

    Presented by

    Nicole Phillips, Office of Student Advocacy, Kennesaw State University
    Eddie Howard , Vice President of Student Affairs, Youngstown State University
    Peggy Crowe, Director of the Counseling and Testing Center, Western Kentucky University
    Helen-Grace Ryan, Vice President for Student Affairs, Bellarmine University

  • Human Trafficking: What Student Affairs Professionals Should Know About Labor and Sex Trafficking

    Matt Ricke, Patrick Hale

    Human Trafficking: What Student Affairs Professionals Should Know About Labor and Sex Trafficking

    Human trafficking is a pervasive national and international phenomenon involving the trafficking of humans for labor and/or sexual slavery. The International Labor Organization estimates that 40.3 million people globally are trafficked. College campuses - and the populations we serve - are vulnerable to this reality. Presenters will provide an overview of the scope of human trafficking, including a review of myths and facts; share the signs and symptoms of human trafficking; examine case studies of college students who were or could have been trafficked; and engage in a discussion regarding prevention and response to human trafficking on campus.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    8:00 am to 8:45 am

    Presented by

    Matt Ricke, Assistant Director/Title IX Coordinator, University of Central Florida
    Patrick Hale, Assistant Director of Intercultural Affairs, Stonehill College

  • Hurricane Florence: Preparing and Responding to a Campus Emergency

    Keith Wickliffe, Donovan Smith

    Hurricane Florence: Preparing and Responding to a Campus Emergency

    In light of increased expectations for severe weather occurring, housing professionals must be prepared for and respond to campus emergencies based around natural disasters. This session will explore the FEMA framework for emergency management. We will also explore how one institution (UNCW) prepared for and responded to a natural disaster (Hurricane Florence) contextualized within the emergency management framework.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    2:45 pm to 3:35 pm

    Presented by

    Keith Wickliffe, Assistant Director, University of North Carolina-Wilmington
    Donovan Smith, University of North Carolina-Wilmington

  • I, too, am a Leader: Mentoring Relationships Among Black Men in Higher Education

    David Hood, Marco Barker, Shannon Gary, Rahjaun Gordon, William Edmond

    I, too, am a Leader: Mentoring Relationships Among Black Men in Higher Education

    Student affairs professionals have found value in mentoring relationships, but little has been written on the experience of a mentoring relationship. Presenters will articulate the learning gained within mentoring relationships by providing real-world context to the small body of literature available on this subject. A panel of mentees and their mentors will explore the germination and development of their relationship and provide insight into its short- and long-term benefits.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    9:10 am to 10:00 am

    Presented by

    David Hood, Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education and Dean, University College, Montclair State University
    Marco Barker, Vice Chancellor for Diversity and Inclusion , University of Nebraska -Lincoln
    Shannon Gary, Associate Vice Provost of Student Life and Dean of Students, University of San Francisco
    Rahjaun Gordon, Associate Director, EOF and Academic Success, Montclair State University
    William Edmond, Assistant Director, Multicultural Affairs, Rice University

  • If They See Something, Will They Do Something? How Collegiate Bystanders Respond to Harmful Situations

    Laura Dahl

    If They See Something, Will They Do Something? How Collegiate Bystanders Respond to Harmful Situations

    For the last decade, research and practice related to bystander intervention in collegiate contexts has focused on sexual violence prevention, yet other types of violence are on the rise at colleges and universities across the United States. How do we know that students will intervene in these situations as well? The presenter will share findings from a new study that measured bystander intervention across a variety of situations. Implications for practice will also be discussed.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    4:00 pm to 4:50 pm

    Presented by

    Laura Dahl, Assistant Professor, North Dakota State University-Main Campus

  • International Application of Title IX

    Matthew Rader, Laura Vele Buchs

    International Application of Title IX

    Sexual misconduct is defined differently around the world. Title IX, a U.S., statute, may or may not have applicability to students studying outside the U.S. Most international students coming to the U.S., will have little to no knowledge of Title IX and how sexual misconduct is defined and managed in the U.S. The presenters will share their knowledge of how colleges and universities should educate international and domestic students going abroad on sexual misconduct.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    4:00 pm to 4:50 pm

    Presented by

    Matthew Rader, AVP and Dean of Students, IES Abroad
    Laura Vele Buchs, Equity and Title IX Investigator, Loyola University Chicago

  • Invigorating a Sense of Belonging in Year One: Proven Recruitment and Engagement Approaches

    Tyson Beale, Courtland James

    Invigorating a Sense of Belonging in Year One: Proven Recruitment and Engagement Approaches

    Maximizing student enrollment with retention-centered engagement activities is a known opportunity among colleges and universities. The influence of non-academic factors on retention, completion, and satisfaction creates an opportunity to re-imagine and re-define structural complexities, policies, and practices that impact outreach. While the diverse populations that mark community colleges offer unique challenges, they also provide a pathway to revisit recruitment techniques and branding strategies. The presenters will review viable engagement procedures and approaches instituted by one Northern Virginia Community College campus that has made an indelible impact for students in year one.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    8:00 am to 8:50 am

    Presented by

    Tyson Beale, Dean of Students, Northern Virginia Community College
    Courtland James, Coordinator for Student Life, Northern Virginia Community College

  • Just Say No: Preventing Burnout of Student Affairs Professionals of Color at PWIs

    Jermaine Pearson

    Just Say No: Preventing Burnout of Student Affairs Professionals of Color at PWIs

    Hiring trends in higher education have not reflected the demands of increasingly diverse student bodies at PWIs. Student affairs professionals (SAPs) from historically underrepresented groups can easily find themselves being the sole advocate supporting students of color although it is not their primary role on campus. The need to be everything to everyone, at the same time can lead to extreme physical exhaustion and mental fatigue. This interactive workshop examines ways in which SAPs can set boundaries in order to thrive personally and professionally, while remaining an integral part of campus culture.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    2:45 pm to 3:35 pm

    Presented by

    Jermaine Pearson, Associate Chaplain of the University for the Protestant Community, Brown University

  • Keep Calm and Call the Dean of Students

    Art Munin, Lori White, Penny Rue, James Rhatigan, Vijay Pendakur, Shadia Sachedina, Bridget Kelly, Denise Balfour Simpson

    Keep Calm and Call the Dean of Students

    The Dean of Students role has widespread name recognition, yet few outside of those who have been Dean understand what it entails. The demands of this position are complicated, multifaceted, and can pull a Dean in many directions, sometimes opposite ones. As such, this position requires a specialized skill set to be successful. This session will explore this role, the skills and talents required to be successful, and its continued evolution within higher education.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    11:20 am to 12:10 pm

    Presented by

    Art Munin, Associate Vice Chancellor & Dean of Students, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh
    Lori White, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, Washington University in St Louis
    Penny Rue, Vice President for Campus Life, Wake Forest University
    James Rhatigan, Vice President for Student Affairs Emeritus, Wichita State University
    Vijay Pendakur, Dean of Students, Cornell University
    Shadia Sachedina, Assistant Vice President for Student Success and Dean of Students, Fashion Institute of Technology
    Bridget Kelly, Associate Professor, University of Maryland-College Park
    Denise Balfour Simpson, Dean of Students, Johnson & Wales University

  • Let’s DISH: Revolutionizing Community College Food Pantries

    Molly Hansen, Julie Elkins, Will Cribby

    Let’s DISH: Revolutionizing Community College Food Pantries

    Food and housing insecurities are higher for students who attend community college, resulting in an increase of on-campus food pantries. The presenters will examine food insecurity at a community college level, provide an overview of the implementation of the DISH food pantry at Bunker Hill Community College, and the use of Smart Choice software in pantry operations. Participants will discuss food insecurity initiatives on their campuses and learn how to create a food pantry operation that suits the needs of their campus.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    11:15 am to 12:05 pm

    Presented by

    Molly Hansen, Bunker Hill Community College
    Julie Elkins, Dean of Students, Bunker Hill Community College
    Will Cribby, Assistant Dean of Students, Bunker Hill Community College

  • LGBTQ+ (In)Visibility: A Case for Strategic Enrollment Management

    Christopher Jorgenson

    LGBTQ+ (In)Visibility: A Case for Strategic Enrollment Management

    This presenter will share current strategic enrollment trends that either ignore or highlight the complexities of LGBTQ+ student identification and subsequent retention and persistence efforts. The act of identifying LGBTQ+ students comes with particular considerations, in order to ensure student safety and privacy. A case will be made for the intentional, strategic inclusion of LGBTQ+ students throughout the admissions process and throughout their time in higher education.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    9:10 am to 10:00 am

    Presented by

    Christopher Jorgenson, Director, Gender & Sexuality Resource Center, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

  • Navigating the Community College Experience: Issues, Trends, and Best Practices

    Kimberly Lowry, Edward Martinez

    Navigating the Community College Experience: Issues, Trends, and Best Practices

    It is not uncommon for community colleges to deal with the reality of shrinking resources, an increasingly diverse student body, and a strong demand for greater accountability. Accordingly, the role of student affairs continues to evolve. Using an interactive facilitated discussion format, participants will learn about issues, trends, and best practices in student affairs at community colleges. A range of professionals from diverse settings will openly share their experiences and strategies in an effort to improve their campuses.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    8:00 am to 8:50 am

    Presented by

    Kimberly Lowry, Vice President of Instruction and Student Services, Lone Star College System
    Edward Martinez, Associate Dean for Student Affairs, Suffolk County Community College

  • Pirate’s Life for Me: Turning the Organizational Misconduct Boat Around Before a Major Shipwreck

    Jessica Ashton, Leila Faranesh, Brooke Kingsley Isbell

    Pirate’s Life for Me: Turning the Organizational Misconduct Boat Around Before a Major Shipwreck

    Have you ever wanted to start a fraternal community over? Turn the boat around and find a new crew? With the right compass, partners, and anchors, rough seas can be overcome. Presenters will share how East Carolina University laid a foundation to ensure student success through campus, community, and headquarters partnerships. Through the development of a formal accountability process, risk prevention strategic plan, and data driven assessment process, attendees will learn how to rebuild relationships, develop processes, and build community.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    2:45 pm to 3:35 pm

    Presented by

    Jessica Ashton, East Carolina University
    Leila Faranesh, Associate Dean of Student & Director, East Carolina University
    Brooke Kingsley Isbell, Assistant Executive Director of Prevention & Accountability, Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity

  • Promising Practices for Educating Student-Citizen Leaders

    Vincent Bowhay, Shana Meyer

    Promising Practices for Educating Student-Citizen Leaders

    Since the founding of America, colleges and universities have strengthened our democracy by educating future leaders and citizens, producing research, and encouraging participation in government institutions. At a time of rapid change, student affairs professionals must take a lead in equipping students to be responsible and effective citizens during and after their time in college. Presenters will discuss ways to deepen cross-curricular civic education, reaffirm our commitment to democratic principles, and connect student affairs to democratic practices. 

    When

    Monday, March 30
    2:45 pm to 3:35 pm

    Presented by

    Vincent Bowhay, Career Development Director, Missouri Western State University
    Shana Meyer, Vice President for Student Affairs, Missouri Western State University

  • Race and Privilege in Fraternity and Sorority Life: Considerations for Practice

    Crystal Garcia, Zachary Shirley

    Race and Privilege in Fraternity and Sorority Life: Considerations for Practice

    Fraternal organizations provide viable opportunities for personal and professional development of college students. However, conversations on race and privilege within and across these organizations oftentimes do not occur. Aligning with their research, the program presenters will provide session attendees with various considerations and strategies for practice when working with fraternal organizations on the topic of race and privilege.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    11:20 am to 12:10 pm

    Presented by

    Crystal Garcia, Assistant Professor, Auburn University Main Campus
    Zachary Shirley, Assistant Dean | Sorority and Fraternity Life, Indiana University—Bloomington

  • Redefining Vulnerability: A Supervisor’s Super Strength

    Amy Wilson, Carmen McCallum, Matthew Shupp

    Redefining Vulnerability: A Supervisor’s Super Strength

    Thanks to Brené Brown, vulnerability has become a well-recognized term, yet it is still not well understood or well accepted. In fact, in the context of a supervisory relationship, individuals sometimes do all they can to avoid any demonstration of vulnerability, or what they equate as weakness. What if we embraced vulnerability as one of our supervisory strengths? This session will introduce a new model of supervision called Inclusive Supervision, and focus participant's exploration around one of the key tenets of the model, demonstrating vulnerability.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    11:15 am to 12:05 pm

    Presented by

    Amy Wilson, Associate Professor, SUNY Buffalo State College
    Carmen McCallum, Assistant Professor, Eastern Michigan University
    Matthew Shupp, Associate Professor, Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania

  • RexPro: Innovative Technology-based Program Designed To Collaboratively Address Mental and Physical Health Behavior Concerns For Student-athletes

    Sally Hyatt, Amy Knab

    RexPro: Innovative Technology-based Program Designed To Collaboratively Address Mental and Physical Health Behavior Concerns For Student-athletes

    Reported levels of mental and physical health issues afflicting postsecondary students is both growing and increasingly critical to student academic success, and this is particularly true for student-athletes. Presenters will discuss the utilization of a technology-based, innovative program developed at a private college to help create a 'culture of campus care' for student-athletes. RexPro is a program that leverages APP technology to develop collaborative, real-time interventions for mental and physical health issues afflicting student-athletes, with application across student types.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    8:00 am to 8:50 am

    Presented by

    Sally Hyatt, Assistant Professor, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania
    Amy Knab, Associate Professor, Queens University of Charlotte

  • Rising Up From Surviving to Thriving: A Resilience Skills-Building Program For LGBTQIA Students

    Camilla Brewer, Quincy Foster

    Rising Up From Surviving to Thriving: A Resilience Skills-Building Program For LGBTQIA Students

    Centering Dr. Anneliese Singh's Queer and Transgender Resilience Workbook (2018), the Georgia Tech LGBTQIA Resource Center launched Rising Up, a 12-week cohort-based group designed to develop resilience in LGBTQIA students, in Fall 2018. The presenters will provide participants an overview of the history, development, and impact of Rising Up. Using national data and program assessment data, participants will then participate in discussion on details and considerations in developing, implementing, and assessing the program at other institutions.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    2:45 pm to 3:35 pm

    Presented by

    Camilla Brewer, Coordinator for the LGBTQIA Resource Center, Georgia Institute of Technology-Main Campus
    Quincy Foster, Student Organizations Coordiantor, Georgia Institute of Technology-Main Campus

  • SFS for the Rest of Us: Common Financial Aid Issues Impacting our Students

    Rachael Stark, Elizabeth Romba

    SFS for the Rest of Us: Common Financial Aid Issues Impacting our Students

    Student affairs professionals are asked questions related to anything and everything on campus. This includes questions about one of the most common sources of stress for our students, finances. Wouldn't it be amazing if we could respond to students' general questions about financial aid in a knowledgeable way and without having to refer them to another office on campus? The presenters will discuss common financial aid questions posed by students and share responses that non-financial aid professionals can provide to cut down on referrals and allow students to be successful.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    8:00 am to 8:50 am

    Presented by

    Rachael Stark, Senior Associate Dean of Students, Temple University
    Elizabeth Romba, College Wide Coordinator of Work Study Programs, Front Range Community College

  • Show Me the Money: Sponsorships, Partnerships, and You

    Rachel Jackson, Zach Manning, Megan Ohlmann

    Show Me the Money: Sponsorships, Partnerships, and You

    Do diminishing resources and budgets have professionals scrambling to do much more with the limited resources available? Three mid-level professionals from a large, public institution will lead a roundtable discussion on developing three different sponsorship models to support student affairs initiatives. Hear about their successes and struggles in working with both on- and off-campus entities to financially support their programs, including orientation and welcome week. Network with others, and learn from and with those attending to talk about how professionals can help close the funding gap through creative collaborations and partnerships on campus.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    4:00 pm to 4:50 pm

    Presented by

    Rachel Jackson, Associate Director, Transition and Engagement, Texas Tech University
    Zach Manning, Associate Director, Texas Tech University
    Megan Ohlmann, Assistant Director, Texas Tech University

  • Solutions Before Problems: Seizing Opportunities for Collaboration in Social Work Programs and Students Affairs

    Joel Quintong, Erin Van Daalwyk, Maura Rhodes

    Solutions Before Problems: Seizing Opportunities for Collaboration in Social Work Programs and Students Affairs

    Many institutions offer advanced social work degrees (MSW) but lack social worker presence within student affairs. This session will highlight a program that embeds a non-clinical social work intern into a student affairs unit & the scope of work that interns perform. Using experiences from two institutions, presenters will review the process of brainstorming, creating, and executing a program, emphasizing the partnership between the sponsoring academic social work department, and how these interns have contributed to student success. 

    When

    Monday, March 30
    2:45 pm to 3:35 pm

    Presented by

    Joel Quintong, Director of Residential Life, Sacred Heart University
    Erin Van Daalwyk, Assistant Dean of Students, University of Wisconsin - Green Bay
    Maura Rhodes, Director of Field Education and Clinical Assistant Professor, Sacred Heart University

  • Speak Now, Or Forever Hold Your Peace: Where To Start Once You’ve Decided To Revamp Your Speech Policies

    Michelle Deutchman, Edgar Dormitorio, Elizabeth Penfil

    Speak Now, Or Forever Hold Your Peace: Where To Start Once You’ve Decided To Revamp Your Speech Policies

    College and university campuses are increasingly the focus of free speech imbroglios and the defendants in lawsuits alleging First Amendment violations. If your institution has not already decided to review and revamp its free speech policies, chances are that it soon will. Student affairs professionals play an integral role in this process. This session, led by free speech experts from the University of California, will address: where to start, whom to include in the process, and how to address myriad issues in light of the changing social and legal landscape. 

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    11:20 am to 12:10 pm

    Presented by

    Michelle Deutchman, Executive Director, UC National Center for Free Speech and Civic Engagement
    Edgar Dormitorio, Assistant Vice Chancellor and Chief of Staff, Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, University of California-Irvine
    Elizabeth Penfil, Campus Counsel, University of California-Irvine

  • Strategies for Engaging APIDA Students about Race

    DeLa Dos, Aysha Dos, Shruti Desai

    Strategies for Engaging APIDA Students about Race

    When engaging students about race, there are many benefits to intentionally considering the purpose, outcomes, design, & target audience. The presenters will share strategies for effectively engaging Asian Pacific Islander Desi American (APIDA) students about race in community specific & open events (e.g., racial triangulation - how the political construction of APIDA identity is built on false racial binaries; social impacts of interpersonal racial determination; identity development; diversity of narratives; and statistics & demographics).

    When

    Monday, March 30
    11:15 am to 12:05 pm

    Presented by

    DeLa Dos, Director, Social Justice Education, Emory University
    Aysha Dos, Director, Center for Student Engagement, Georgetown University
    Shruti Desai, Chief of Staff, Washington University in St Louis

  • Supporting Academically At-Risk Adult Students in an Online Learning Environment

    Jay Keehn, Nikki Marks

    Supporting Academically At-Risk Adult Students in an Online Learning Environment

    The adult student faces significant challenges toward achieving their goal of successful degree completion. They have multiple family obligations, several employment responsibilities, financial stress, academic rust, a lack of proper resources, and a weakened sense of technology savviness. Thus, support for these students must be tailored accordingly. Employing the philosophical foundation of intrusive advising, this presentation will further examine appropriate advising strategies to support adult students on academic probation in an online learning environment.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    10:15 am to 11:05 am

    Presented by

    Jay Keehn, Executive Director, Union Institute & University
    Nikki Marks, Director of Student Services, Union Institute & University

  • Supporting Participation of Working Class Students in International Education Experiences

    David Archer, Ramona Lewis, Liliana Salas

    Supporting Participation of Working Class Students in International Education Experiences

    This session will provide information related to current literature on working class students' participation in international education activities in higher education; best practices for creating more inclusive international and study abroad experiences for these students; and to highlight lessons learned related to the benefits and challenges of study abroad and international education activity participation for working class students on our campus.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    11:15 am to 12:05 pm

    Presented by

    David Archer, Assistant Professor, Western Michigan University
    Ramona Lewis, Faculty Specialist , Western Michigan University
    Liliana Salas, Director, Western Michigan University

  • Supporting Students with Disabilities on Campus: How Two Postsecondary Education Institutions Maximize Collaborative Opportunities to Promote Inclusion on Campus

    Tara Rowe, Katie Norland, Drew Andrews

    Supporting Students with Disabilities on Campus: How Two Postsecondary Education Institutions Maximize Collaborative Opportunities to Promote Inclusion on Campus

    With diminishing resources, collaborations and partnerships are necessary to support student success. Collaboration encourages creativity and innovation, builds relationships, offers a greater depth of knowledge, and introduces us to new people and ideas. We must challenge ourselves to form relationships and partnerships inside and outside of established frameworks of our institutional structures. The presenters will share how two different institutions in Florida have collaborated to support student success in unique programs with distinctive needs.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    8:00 am to 8:50 am

    Presented by

    Tara Rowe, Assistant Director THRIVE, University of North Florida
    Katie Norland, Katie Norland
    Drew Andrews, Technical Assistance Coordinator, FCSUA at the University of Central Florida

  • Surviving and Thriving: Black Men Navigating the Doctoral Journey

    Jarrod Druery, Robert Sparks, Jason Ottley, Jason Dorsette, Joshua Moore, Arthur Doctor

    Surviving and Thriving: Black Men Navigating the Doctoral Journey

    Black men are encouraged to pursue doctoral degrees as a means of upward career mobility. However, the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics reported that Black men comprised only two percent of the total 55,000 doctoral degrees conferred in the U.S. in 2016. This disparity may be explained by the encounters that Black men face in doctoral programs at historically White institutions entrenched with barriers to success, gendered racism, and anti-Blackness. Presenters will explore the experiences of Black men navigating, overcoming challenges, and excelling in doctoral programs and beyond.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    10:15 am to 11:05 am

    Presented by

    Jarrod Druery, Graduate Assistant, University of Louisville
    Robert Sparks, Director of Student Conduct and Community Standards, Agnes Scott College
    Jason Ottley, Assistant Director, First Year Advising, American University
    Jason Dorsette, Director, Advancing Academic Equity for Student Success, Oregon State University
    Joshua Moore, Assistant Dean of Students, Diversity and Inclusion, Wittenberg University
    Arthur Doctor, Director of Fraternal Leadership and Learning, University of Mississippi--Main Campus

  • The Next Frontier: Utilizing Virtual Media to Inspire Community-Minded Leadership & Civic Engagement

    Christina Guerra, Andrew Todd

    The Next Frontier: Utilizing Virtual Media to Inspire Community-Minded Leadership & Civic Engagement

    As the next generation of students emerges, student affairs professionals are challenged to adapt their initiatives to a new culture of digital nativism. While traditional methods of engagement are necessary, innovation through inclusion of virtual media has the potential to connect with 21st-century processing skills. Presenters will explore a cross-institutional partnership designed to encourage increased engagement and student success through integration of virtual reality and onlinge gaming components into civic-minded and community-engaged programming. 

    When

    Monday, March 30
    11:15 am to 12:05 pm

    Presented by

    Christina Guerra, Civic Engagement Coordinator, Texas A&M San Antonio
    Andrew Todd, IT Digital Media Specialist, San Antonio Community College

  • The Pathways to Flourishing: Changing Campus Culture to Promote Positive Mental Health

    Helen Matusow-Ayres, Rhonda Schaller

    The Pathways to Flourishing: Changing Campus Culture to Promote Positive Mental Health

    The Pathways Project promotes student wellbeing throughout the academic experience, in the studio/classroom as well as outside of it. Student affairs staff, faculty and students are engaged in an inquiry and implementation process to change the culture of studio education from stressfully competitive to mindfully flourishing. This session engages participants in the inquiry and discovery process and provides guidelines for developing an inquiry team to study and change your campus culture to promote positive mental health.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    2:45 pm to 3:35 pm

    Presented by

    Helen Matusow-Ayres, Vice President for Student Affairs, Pratt Institute-Main
    Rhonda Schaller, Director, Career and Professional Development, Pratt Institute-Main

  • Toward a Theory of White Racial Location: Critically Engaging White College Students on their Relationship to White Supremacy

    Zak Foste

    Toward a Theory of White Racial Location: Critically Engaging White College Students on their Relationship to White Supremacy

    Drawing on results from a recent qualitative study, this presentation invites participants to think about how to critically engage white students on race and racism through the lens of racial positioning. Rather than simply focus on shedding racist behaviors and attitudes, this approach emphasizes the importance of locating oneself as embedded in systems of white supremacy. Participants are invited to consider how the theory influences design of programs and initiatives to engage white students.

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    2:45 pm to 3:35 pm

    Presented by

    Zak Foste, University of Kansas

  • Virtual Reality: How Students’ Self-Perception of Invincibility Online Impacts College Campuses

    Jordan Draper, Kevin Pitt, Amy Miele

    Virtual Reality: How Students’ Self-Perception of Invincibility Online Impacts College Campuses

    Today's students are unlike any other peer group due to the advances in technology and changes in risk-taking behavior. These shifts have created a sense of invincibility for students where they are unable to differentiate the actions they make online from the physical world. This behavior has led to many issues on campuses. The presenters will highlight information on student invincibility and show connections that will help administrators continue to effectively develop students.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    8:00 am to 8:50 am

    Presented by

    Jordan Draper, Dean of Students & Title IX Coordinator, The College of New Jersey
    Kevin Pitt, Director, Rutgers University
    Amy Miele, Assistant Director of Student Affairs Compliance & Title IX, Rutgers University

  • Was the 2018 Election a Turning Point? An Overview of NSLVE Findings & Lessons for 2020

    Adam Gismondi

    Was the 2018 Election a Turning Point? An Overview of NSLVE Findings & Lessons for 2020

    For the first time in history, we have data for student participation from four U.S. election years, including 2018. The National Study of Learning, Voting, & Engagement (NSLVE) tells a story about political engagement, but it also raises questions for 2020 for higher education institutions to consider. The presenters will share exclusive NSLVE findings from over 1,000 institutions and more than 10,000,000 students across the 2012-2018 elections and, with session participants, will explore what the findings mean for 2020. Which trends will "stick," and which ones might fade?

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    10:15 am to 11:05 am

    Presented by

    Adam Gismondi, Director of Impact, Institute for Democracy & Higher Education, Tufts University

  • We Never Thought It Would Happen to Us: Student Affairs Response, Recovery, and Lessons Learned After a Campus Shooting

    Christine Reed Davis, Kevin Bailey, David Spano, Karen Shaffer

    We Never Thought It Would Happen to Us: Student Affairs Response, Recovery, and Lessons Learned After a Campus Shooting

    Student affairs plays a critical role in the care of a campus community during and after a tragedy. Strong collaborations are required for immediate and ongoing efforts to address harm and begin healing. Presenters from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte's Division of Students Affairs areas of counseling and psychological services, the dean of students office, and student venues and engagement will outline responses, recovery actions, and lessons learned after the fatal campus shooting on April 30, 2019.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    9:10 am to 10:00 am

    Presented by

    Christine Reed Davis, Associate Vice Chancellor/Dean of Students, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    Kevin Bailey, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    David Spano, Associate Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    Karen Shaffer, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and Director of Student Activities, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

  • Who is Heard When Saying “#MeToo”?: Creating Intersectional Sexual Violence Prevention & Education

    Kallie Friede

    Who is Heard When Saying “#MeToo”?: Creating Intersectional Sexual Violence Prevention & Education

    The presenter will discuss the need in higher education for sexual assault prevention and education that is intentionally inclusive of students of color and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and asexual (LGBTQIA+) students. For student affairs professionals who work with violence prevention efforts or work with marginalized student populations, the presenter will seek to challenge what is included in violence prevention in order to provide resources and education that suits the needs of all students.

    When

    Monday, March 30
    10:15 am to 11:05 am

    Presented by

    Kallie Friede, Associate Student Services Coordinator, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

  • Wired and Tired: The Impact of Sleep Habits on College Students

    Alison Black, Melinda Stoops

    Wired and Tired: The Impact of Sleep Habits on College Students

    We all know that most college students struggle to create and maintain healthy sleep habits, but what causes and contributes to this toxic sleep culture and what can we do about it? The presenters will share research about sleep and college students, including: statistics about habits, the health impacts of poor sleep hygiene, and the efficacy of sleep education programs. The presenters will provide participants with tangible strategies to adapt to their campus to help address the problem. 

    When

    Tuesday, March 31
    2:45 pm to 3:35 pm

    Presented by

    Alison Black, Class Dean, Wellesley College
    Melinda Stoops, Associate Vice President for Student Health and Wellness/Student Affairs Title IX Coordinator, Boston College